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Nardo Wick Goes Viral After Revealing He Used To Rob People For Thousands

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Nardo Wick
Scott Dudelson via Getty Images

If there's one thing about Nardo Wick, there ain't no cap in his raps. The booming Jacksonville artist known for his smash "Who Want Smoke?" recently revealed he used to mug people for thousands of dollars at a time…

Nardo chopped it up with Big Facts and spoke on how Lil Durk, 21 Savage and G Herbo heard about him via "word of mouth" and hopped on the "Who Want Smoke?" remix, which has over 77 million views. But the interview took a turn when Nardo recalled his risky former lifestyle.

After mentioning that he feels like a regular nine-to-five job is "torture," Nardo explained, "I was just looking at it like if I go rob a n**** and get this much, why would I go to work?" He continued, "If I go do this to somebody and get seven-thousand dollars, five-thousand dollars…"

"[Why would I] go to work for two weeks and make $500? Hell nah." The 20-year-old then recalled how he learned from a young age that his parents were making money illegally.

His mom served five years behind bars for fraud while his dad used to bring home "big ass trash bags" filled with cash, seemingly from dealing drugs.

Some viewers criticized Nardo and the co-hosts (Big Bank, DJ Scream and Baby Jade) for allegedly glorifying robbery and ignoring the associated dangers: "Risking a bid over somebody else's earned money. This is nuts lol."

Well, Nardo caught wind of the backlash and offered a response.

"There is nothing wrong with a job, robbing ain't cool at all and I ain't try to make it seem cool I was speaking on past events, what I was doin' young and dumb, I changed for the better and learned from my mistakes," he told his 770k IG followers in a note.

Nardo recently dropped his debut project, 'Who is Nardo Wick?' with fierce, standout cuts like "Wicked Witch" and "Shhh." He told Complex his dad acted as the audio engineer for 14 of the 18 songs, recording Nardo at their house in Jacksonville.

The tape peaked at #19 on the Billboard 200 album chart with 29k first-week equivalent units sold.